AMISH SAWMILL AT WORK! THIS I HOW WE GET WOOD FOR HEAT!

Today I was headed out to pick up some slab wood from this Amish crew I have become friends with. I thought I would take a minute and show you their operation. They do an amazing amount of work everyday with only 4 guys. I hope you enjoy!

20 Replies to “AMISH SAWMILL AT WORK! THIS I HOW WE GET WOOD FOR HEAT!”

  1. I understand that the Amish can use a generator. No electricity or telephone line can they tie into, as it is supplied by someone other than their group. Thanks for the video.

  2. Wow. Cool op! Does the operator just eyeball the final sizing once he gets her slabbed down? Or is there gauging on there somewhere for precise cuts. I couldn’t tell from the footage.

    Very cool. Thx.

  3. having worked in sawmills myself id love to have that setup, as opposed to the home sawmills they sell today

  4. I've been contacted with Logging but these Boy's got it Running like Clockwork think few people could Learn of them Tidy work mill area

  5. What does a bundle of slabs cost? 20 years ago or so when a few mills were still running around here we could buy a big bundle for $10 loaded. It's not the best firewood but it does burn goo and burns hot but burns up faster than split wood. But for the price you couldn't beat it.

  6. These ain't true amish. These what is know as fake amish. They wear the clothes to get the tax breaks and thats it. There are no true amish any more. A true amish never uses a machine, unless pulled by horses, run by horses, water powered saw mills. No tractors, cars, or trucks. People should be raising all kinds of hell over these tax evaders!! fake fake fake!!!!!

  7. Amish people don't pay taxes yet they use our hospitals, drive on our roads, and suck the air we have to breathe while pretending to live in the 1800s. Give me a break. Thumbs down for sure.

  8. My dad had a "tie" mill back in late forties an early fifties. I made many a tie for the railroad, and even watched them take the ties and drive them under the rails. I was fascinated by it back then cause what I seen won't be for much longer, I'm sure that plastic will take its place. I guess the good old day is now called present day. Every "tie" I cut was 6" x 8" and weighed a good one hundred fifty pounds and I sawed a tie, then did my own "chain" which was a term used in the staking of the wood in piles. I seen many a 12 hour day then and I didn't complain cause the cuffing you got along the side of the head kept you motivated. I think of the horses on the roads back in Amish country, and kinda surprised that it wasn't "horse" power on the mills too.. oddly used engine oil was used to treat them to keep from rotting till they come up with creosote, a product that forms in the wood stove stack from burning green wood

  9. The very first saw its called a straight liner most cut one straight line on a piece of sawed material….wish I could find a sawmill like that near me. 27557

  10. Yep, unlike most, the do a honest days work for an honest days pay. That is what the were taught unlike the lazy bums produced in the last couple of generations.

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